Meet the team

Dr James Kirkbride

Principal Investigator, UCL

James is a psychiatric epidemiologist, with a background in social science. He is currently a Reader in Epidemiology within the Division of Psychiatry at UCL. James is the Principal Investigator on the PsyMaptic study, and led the development of the current version of the tool (Version 2). With Profs Peter Jones, Jeremy Coid and others, he founded and developed the original (version 1) PsyMaptic model. You can find out more about him here.

Prof Gianluca Baio (UCL)

Gianluca is currently a Professor in Medical Statistics in the Department of Statistical Science at UCL. Within this project, Gianluca was the lead statistician, being responsible for the development of the statistical prediction model. You can find out more about him here.

Prof Peter Jones (University of Cambridge)

Peter is a clinical academic psychiatrist, epidemiologist and an early intervention in psychosis expert. Within this project, Peter and James conceived and designed the original inception of the work. Peter was a principal investigator on the AESOP study, from which some of the seed data for the models originate. He also provided clinical and service level expertise to inform model development. You can find out more about him here.

Dr Keltie McDonald (UCL)

Keltie is an epidemiologist and a Research Fellow within the UCL Division of Psychiatry. Within this project, Keltie coordinated the model validation, drafting of the paper and was responsible for data management. You can find out more about her here.

Dr Tao (Christina) Ding (UCL)

Christina worked on the PsyMaptic project while she was a Research Associate in Medical Statistics at the Department of Statistical Science at UCL. Christina is the project statistician for PsyMaptic, being responsible for development of the statistical prediction models in conjunction with Prof Baio. You can find out more about her here.

Dr Pia Wohland (University of Queensland)

Pia is a demographer based at the University of Queensland (Australia) and Hull-York Medical School. Pia provided population-level (denominator) projections for England at small area level (electoral wards), stratified by age, sex and ethnicity, based on her established EthPop methodology. These projections underpin our estimates of new cases of psychosis in England each year. You can find our more about Pia here

Pia Wohland

Prof David Osborn (UCL)

David is a psychiatric epidemiologist who has trained in medicine and social/political sciences. David works as a NHS consultant psychiatrist in acute community psychiatry in Camden and Islington NHS Foundation Trust. Within PsyMaptic, David provided clinical and service level expertise to inform model development. You can find out more about him here.

Prof Paul French (Manchester Metropolitan University)

Paul is a clinician and early intervention in psychosis expert, being a Clinical Lead for various Early Intervention in Psychosis services in the North West. Like David, Paul, within this project, provided clinical and service level expertise to inform model development. You can find out more about him here.

 

Prof Jeremy Coid (Queen Mary University London)

Jeremy is a forensic psychiatrist and Emeritus Professor at Queen Mary University London. He was Principal Investigator of the East London First Episode Psychoses study, which provided some of the seed data used in the prediction models which underpin the PsyMaptic tool. Jeremy was also involved in the development of the original (version 1) PsyMaptic tool. You can read more about him here.

Hannah Ker (UCL)

Hannah is currently working as a Humanitarian Data Scientist at MapAction. Within PsyMaptic Hannah was a Research Assistant, assisting with data visualisation and preparation of figures. You can find out more about her here.

Rebecca Dliwayo (UCL)

Rebecca was a research assistant on the PsyMaptic project. 

Dan Pittaway (UCL)

Dan is currently studying the MSc in Clinical Mental Health Sciences in the Division of Psychiatry at UCL. He is carrying out a placement with PsyMaptic, working as an assistant content developer.

Visualisation dashboard

The PsyMaptic interactive dashboard was developed by Cityseer.io and is powered by Mapbox. Spatial boundaries are made available under the Open Government Licence v3.0 licensed by the Office for National Statistics. Maps contain Ordinance Survey data © Crown copyright and database right 2019.

Funding

Version 1 of PsyMaptic was funded by a Wellcome Trust fellowship award (WT085540) to Kirkbride and an NIHR programme grant to Jones (RP-PG-0606-1335). Version 1 of PsyMaptic was also supported by the NIHR CLAHRC East of England (now the NIHR Applied Research Collaboration East of England). 

Version 2 of PsyMaptic was funded by an Enhancement Award from the Wellcome Trust (101272/Z/13/A). This work was also supported by the National Institute for Health Research, University College London Hospital, Biomedical Research Centre. David Osborn is in part supported by the National Institute for Health Research ARC North Thames. Peter Jones is supported by the Wellcome Trust (095844/Z/11/Z), the NIHR ARC East of England, and by NIHR (RPPG‐0616‐20003). 

Seed data for the models used in both versions 1 & 2 of the PsyMaptic tool was made possible via MRC and Stanley Medical Research Institute funding (ÆSOP), St Bartholomew’s Hospital and the Royal London Hospital Special Trustees and East London and the City Mental Health NHS Trust R&D funding (ELFEP) and Wellcome Trust funding (SEPEA; WT085540).

The study was conducted independently from the research funders. The views expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of the funding agencies.

Acknowledgements

We are very grateful to Jay Nairn, Amy Clark, Carl Money, Thomas Bardsley, and Alison Brabban of NHS England for their expertise and advice. We thank Carl Money and Thomas Bardsley for running our validation scripts on a non‐supressed version of the MHSDS data at NHS England. 

We thank all EIP regional leads for their input into the initial results of the modelling process, which allowed us to further develop and refine our models. We are grateful to Gareth Simons from Cityseer.io for development of the “PsyMaptic‐A” web visualisation tool.

We thank those who participated in the original ÆSOP, ELFEP and SEPEA studies, whose aggregated data has allowed us to develop a tool to inform future mental health services provision for psychosis in England.

Use of the Wellcome logo on this site was granted by written permission of the Wellcome Trust.